ferrari factory tour: design

9 Aug

image © designboom

founded in 1929 as a racecar sponsor and manufacturer, ferrari has been producing hand-finished road vehicles since 1947.
the ferrari factory was designed by french architect jean nouvel and modernized beginning in 1997 by company president
luca di montezemolo. all ferraris in the world continue to be produced exclusively on the maranello campus,
where every ferrari is produced custom to order, and all installations are performed by hand. as a result, the company
produces approximately 10 to 12 cars a day.

designboom visited the ferrari factories and is excited to bring you a three-part behind-the-scenes look at the vehicles’ production.
this article, the last in our series, gives an overview of the design and customization of ferrari cars, a process that starts
long before the engine parts are produced, and continues on to inform the installation and assembly of each custom vehicle.

image © designboom

 

image © designboom

 

image © designboom

 

image © designboom

 

image © designboom

 

image © designboom

 

image © designboom

 

image © designboom

 

image © designboom

 

image © designboom

 

image © designboom

 

image © designboom

 

image © designboom

 

image © designboom

 

image © designboom

 

image © designboom

 

image © designboom

 

image © designboom

 

image © designboom

 

image © designboom

 

image © designboom

 

the team of designers, engineers, and technicians behind vehicle design work together at the ‘centro sviluppo prodotto’.
ferrari’s long history and emphasis on its racing vehicles drives technological innovation in all aspects of vehicle design
and production. for example, the vehicle chassis of the ‘458 italia’ advantages from a modular design wherein new alloys
support high-resistance aluminum extrusions originally developed for use in the aviation industry. the result is a lower-weight body,
improving performance and handling, with increased structural rigidity.

ferrari uses autodesk 3D modeling software during the long early phases of design development prior to prototyping.
designs are also all tested heavily in the company’s wind tunnel, where models up to 65% of full size can be tested
in wind conditions of up to 250mph, and each real vehicle submitted to testing must withstand winds of at least 150mph.
originally designed by renzo piano, the wind tunnel features a custom ‘rolling road’ system, synchronized to wind speed,
to minimize the boundary layer problem of air flow under the vehicle. different vehicle positions, such as roll, pitch,
and yaw, can also be simulated in the facility.

the video below showcases a range of design choices  at work in the innovative four-wheel drive control
of the company’s ‘FF’ (‘ferrari four’) model, the most recent addition to the ferrari line.

 

looking towards the future, company president luca di montezemolo cites a twofold approach to innovation
that integrates technological advance and ecological thinking into the ferrari vehicle philosophy, with its emphasis
on comfort, speed, and enjoyment.  montezemolo takes as a goal the creation by ferrari of the fastest hybrid car
in the world, and the company seeks to improve gasoline consumption and reduce carbon emissions across its line.

at the same time, montezemolo imagines that the ferrari of the future is a company that creates a diverse range
of vehicles to speak to the diversity across its drivers. he cites by way of example the ‘FF’, which is the first ferrari
to contain four seats but which nonetheless achieves 660 horsepower, thus offering a multiuse vehicle equally at home
transporting passengers and baggage and racing on the tracks.

ferrari president luca di montezemolo:

ecology is crucial for the future of the planet, and we are all busy in this direction.
[nonetheless] working day and night to improve the ecology approach, ferrari will never lose
its characteristic [emphasis on the] emotion of driving, acceleration, freedom, and enjoyment.

 

all ferrari vehicles can be customized in almost every level of detail, although certain selections vary across vehicle models
or from country to country. the company’s ateliers function as a kind of behind-the-scenes showroom where clients work
with ferrari representatives and view the range of steering wheels, rims, fabric and thread samples, chair models, colour chips,
and other pieces from which they may select in designing their vehicle.

ferrari puts high emphasis on colour design, and the vehicle’s exterior can be produced in one of a range of different tones
and finishes. sportive options beyond the standard paintjob include a racing or historical racing livery or bicolour pattern.
wheels are produced in standard and sport rims in a range of finishes, with colour clutches selected separately.
historically ferrari has also produced special-edition rims.

the vehicle’s interior is blanketed in high quality leathers, produced in both natural and bolder colours. everything from the piping
to the stitching to the insignia colour on the seats is available in an expansive range of colours, all to be hand-completed
in a dedicated sewing workshop prior to vehicle assembly. the seats themselves, available in a scale of sizes and with the option
of being fully electric, differ in style from angular carbon fibre racing seats to daytona style seats, in addition to the standard model.

no detail is overlooked or beyond customizability in a ferrari, where the seatbelts can also be selected with either 3 or 4 -points;
the dashboard colours can be customized; and the steering wheels are available in standard, leather, or racing designs,
with or without integrated LEDs, and all featuring a button-like central insignia selectable from a range of colours.

readers can explore the customization process and create their own unique ferraris on the company’s website
by clicking the ‘explore’ link next to any model in the current range, and then selecting ‘configure’ (requires free registration).

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